Monthly Archive: June 2013

Kids With Food Allergies Foundation (KFA) recently posted that there are now four different epinephrine auto-injector devices on the market. What does this mean for me, a parent whose child has life-threatening food allergies? It means a few things. But most importantly, it means I need to educate and train myself on using the auto-injectors now, so I’m prepared and can respond promptly if my son or another child has a severe and life-threatening allergic reaction. It also means I need to make sure that, in addition to family and friends, my son’s teachers know how to use his epinephrine auto-injector device. KFA in its blog post stresses the importance of knowing the differences between the four commercially available epinephrine auto-injectors and making sure we get the one […]

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While it is virtually impossible to predict allergic reactions and anaphylactic reactions can vary widely, co-existent asthma and exercise can be key factors in whether someone will be prone to more severe allergic reactions, Dr. Robert A. Wood, chief pediatric allergist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, says during a Food Allergy Research & Education conference.

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“Failure to treat promptly with epinephrine unifies virtually every death that’s ever happened from a food reaction,” Dr. Robert A. Wood, the chief pediatric allergist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, says when talking to a food allergy group about anaphylaxis management. Speaking at Food Allergy Research & Education’s 20th annual food allergy conference in Arlington, Va., Dr. Wood says he gives the same message to other allergists, pediatricians, and parents: “It’s very hard to find reactions where epinephrine was given promptly where there was a bad outcome.” Driving the point home, the internationally recognized food allergy expert says that of the three recent deaths from food allergies: the college kid in Boston, the 11-year-old child in Utah, and the 8-year-old child in New Jersey; none of them received epinephrine promptly when they started to react.

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Johns Hopkins Children’s Center posts an announcement that is sure to thrill the food allergy community: A little boy, Will Fountain, “beat” not one, but two of his food allergies. According to the article, penned by Fountain, after participating in separate egg and peanut allergy studies under the care of Dr. Robert A. Wood and his team at Hopkins, he can now safely eat egg and peanut. Moreover, Dr. Wood thinks he “may be the first person in the world to have been cured of two food allergies.”

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