milk allergy Archive

This post was written for inclusion in the World Breastfeeding 2013 Blog Carnival, co-hosted by NursingFreedom.org and the San Diego Breastfeeding Center. The participants wrote and shared their stories about community support and normalizing breastfeeding. *** I often joke that the two things in life I’m really good at are writing and breastfeeding. I should probably rephrase this to say writing and nursing are two things that have been rewarding for me and at which I’ve been successful, at least by my own standards! With my first child, my son, you could say I was quite lucky that we found a breastfeeding-friendly, or a so-called baby-friendly, hospital; that my colostrum and milk came in quickly after my cesarean section; and that baby boy had a […]

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“Failure to treat promptly with epinephrine unifies virtually every death that’s ever happened from a food reaction,” Dr. Robert A. Wood, the chief pediatric allergist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, says when talking to a food allergy group about anaphylaxis management. Speaking at Food Allergy Research & Education’s 20th annual food allergy conference in Arlington, Va., Dr. Wood says he gives the same message to other allergists, pediatricians, and parents: “It’s very hard to find reactions where epinephrine was given promptly where there was a bad outcome.” Driving the point home, the internationally recognized food allergy expert says that of the three recent deaths from food allergies: the college kid in Boston, the 11-year-old child in Utah, and the 8-year-old child in New Jersey; none of them received epinephrine promptly when they started to react.

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Johns Hopkins Children’s Center posts an announcement that is sure to thrill the food allergy community: A little boy, Will Fountain, “beat” not one, but two of his food allergies. According to the article, penned by Fountain, after participating in separate egg and peanut allergy studies under the care of Dr. Robert A. Wood and his team at Hopkins, he can now safely eat egg and peanut. Moreover, Dr. Wood thinks he “may be the first person in the world to have been cured of two food allergies.”

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I hope everyone had a nice Memorial Day weekend. As the sun started to set on Sunday and the kids were settling down for the evening, I started thinking about family and traditions. While we often make our own dairy-free oatmeal sugar cookies, we do have what I call our “quick mix-fix” brand that is free of the top eight allergens and, frankly, absolutely delicious. You just add dairy-free margarine and your choice of milk, and in a few minutes, voila! You have a safe, mouth-watering treat that even my mother-in-law finds delicious! So as the summer approaches and you have visitors who are in need of a quick, safe alternative to your regular go-to treat, just pop this in the oven and you will be a hit!

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Dr. Robert A. Wood, the chief pediatric allergist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, tells a food allergy group that they still don’t know why food allergies are more common now than they were 20 years ago, but that specific nutritional factors may be at play. For example, folate excess is more prevalent now than it was 20 years ago, because we started supplementing the diets of pregnant women with folate, Dr. Wood says during the Food Allergy Research & Education conference session.

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Discovering food allergies and obstructive sleep apnea in my son when he was younger gave me a crash course in motherhood. I quickly learned how to manage both and be my child’s best advocate. Here are five key ways you can be your child’s too: 1) Trust your gut; 2) Get help and support; 3) Educate yourself and others; 4) Speak up, don’t be shy; and 5) Breathe. Trusting your instincts is by far the best piece of advice I could offer to any first-time parent. When my oldest child was a baby, he often woke up every 45 minutes–literally. Lots of things would get him back to sleep at night, but he often woke up within the hour.

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