peanut allergy Archive

With back-to-school season upon us, food allergy mamas like me are in full swing getting supplies but also safe snacks for our kiddos. Many schools are now nut-free, which means the snacks we send in must be nut-free too. So when Snyder’s of Hanover reached out to me to review their pretzels, their MADE IN A PEANUT-FREE FACILITY absolutely caught my eye! I just love when companies recognize a call being made by their patrons and follow through with flying colors.

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I’m thrilled to share with you a book I just reviewed for Children’s Literature, written by Jessica Jacobs and illustrated by Jacquelyn Roslyn. With two children in every classroom having a food allergy, The Peanut Pickle is a must-read for kids with food allergies, their friends, and those that care for them. Jacobs does a wonderful job explaining what having a peanut allergy means on a daily basis.

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With food allergies and developmental issues on the rise, many parents are finding themselves overwhelmed, especially at mealtime. For the parent with their first child or a child with food allergies, the introduction of solid food can be particularly stressful. Kelly Benson-Vogt, a speech and language pathologist and the owner of Pediatric Feeding & Speech Solutions, shares practical tips for navigating mealtime. Whether your child has significant eating hurdles or is the so-called picky eater, I hope her advice proves to be as helpful to you as it has been for my family.

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“Failure to treat promptly with epinephrine unifies virtually every death that’s ever happened from a food reaction,” Dr. Robert A. Wood, the chief pediatric allergist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, says when talking to a food allergy group about anaphylaxis management. Speaking at Food Allergy Research & Education’s 20th annual food allergy conference in Arlington, Va., Dr. Wood says he gives the same message to other allergists, pediatricians, and parents: “It’s very hard to find reactions where epinephrine was given promptly where there was a bad outcome.” Driving the point home, the internationally recognized food allergy expert says that of the three recent deaths from food allergies: the college kid in Boston, the 11-year-old child in Utah, and the 8-year-old child in New Jersey; none of them received epinephrine promptly when they started to react.

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Johns Hopkins Children’s Center posts an announcement that is sure to thrill the food allergy community: A little boy, Will Fountain, “beat” not one, but two of his food allergies. According to the article, penned by Fountain, after participating in separate egg and peanut allergy studies under the care of Dr. Robert A. Wood and his team at Hopkins, he can now safely eat egg and peanut. Moreover, Dr. Wood thinks he “may be the first person in the world to have been cured of two food allergies.”

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