special report Archive

While it is virtually impossible to predict allergic reactions and anaphylactic reactions can vary widely, co-existent asthma and exercise can be key factors in whether someone will be prone to more severe allergic reactions, Dr. Robert A. Wood, chief pediatric allergist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, says during a Food Allergy Research & Education conference.

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“Failure to treat promptly with epinephrine unifies virtually every death that’s ever happened from a food reaction,” Dr. Robert A. Wood, the chief pediatric allergist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, says when talking to a food allergy group about anaphylaxis management. Speaking at Food Allergy Research & Education’s 20th annual food allergy conference in Arlington, Va., Dr. Wood says he gives the same message to other allergists, pediatricians, and parents: “It’s very hard to find reactions where epinephrine was given promptly where there was a bad outcome.” Driving the point home, the internationally recognized food allergy expert says that of the three recent deaths from food allergies: the college kid in Boston, the 11-year-old child in Utah, and the 8-year-old child in New Jersey; none of them received epinephrine promptly when they started to react.

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Dr. Robert A. Wood, the chief pediatric allergist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, tells a food allergy group that they still don’t know why food allergies are more common now than they were 20 years ago, but that specific nutritional factors may be at play. For example, folate excess is more prevalent now than it was 20 years ago, because we started supplementing the diets of pregnant women with folate, Dr. Wood says during the Food Allergy Research & Education conference session.

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